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Hidden Figures – This video is the remarkable true story of women who crossed racial and gender lines to contribute important work to NASA.

Katherine Goble. Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan, and Mary Jackson are some of the many forgotten women, especially black women, who achieved amazing things in spite of the prejudice and road blocks thrown at them. All extremely brilliant women, they were the brains behind the launch of John Glenn into space in the 1960’s space race. Their work helped our country to put a man on the moon.

The movie is great and I hope you will see it. It does a pretty good job of telling what the women went through – early childhood and education, what they suffered in order to be accepted in society, and obstacles they encountered at work. The extras in the special Blu-Ray edition relate more of the many achievements of these incredible women. Here are a few highlights (some of the information obtained through my further research):

Katherine Goble Johnson

Katherine was a math prodigy who graduated from West Virginia State College summa cum laude at only age 18. She married and had three children. Sadly, Mr. Goble died of a brain tumor. Later she remarried.

Katherine was an aerospace technologist. She verified the computer’s numbers for John Glenn’s orbit around the earth in 1962, calculated the historic Apollo 11 trip to the moon, and worked on the calculations that helped bring Apollo 13 safely back to earth after it malfunctioned in 1970.

Dorothy Johnson Vaughan

Dorothy received her training at Wilberforce University in Ohio in 1929. She married Howard Vaughan and they had six children. In 1943, Dorothy went to work at Langley as one of the African-American women who were hired due to President Roosevelt’s executive order forbidding racial, ethnic, or religious discrimination in the defense industry as he sought to fill the jobs needed for the war effort. Dorothy was one of the countless female human “computers” who did the math for the space industry.

Later when IBM introduced digital computers to replace the human computers, Dorothy was smart enough to figure a way to keep her job and the jobs of all of the other women. She taught herself and them the Fortran programming Language for the IBM 704 mainframe computers that NASA was installing. (Just look at that room full of machines in the movie and realize that your cell phone has more computing power than all of that!!)

Mary Jackson

Mary graduated from Hampton Institute with bachelor’s degrees in Mathematics and physical science. Frustrated and unhappy about the discrimination against her in the work place, Mary almost resigned. However, her supervisor, Kazimierz Czarnecki encouraged her to train as an engineer. Mary had to fight racial prejudice but she successfully finished the course and was promoted to aerospace engineer in 1958 at the age of 37. She wrote many papers and studied data that helped to improve US planes. Mary achieved the most senior rank in the engineering department, but took a demotion to become a human resources administrator until her retirement in 1985. She spent her time helping other women and minorities to advance their careers.

One of the things that is downplayed a bit in the movies is the tremendous religious faith of these three wonderful women. They all just wanted to succeed and were willing to put up with the prejudice against them. In that era, blacks were often just happy to have a job. Their gratitude for what they had should put those of us who have never encountered their obstacles to shame. They are an inspiration!

It is finally time after 55 years that Katherine, Dorothy, and Mary are recognized for their achievements. Though things have changed a lot since the 1940’s and 50’s, there is still a struggle for full racial and gender equality. The stories of these women will go a long way to erase the idea that women, especially black women are inferior.

Here is a trailer to the movie:

http://www.ign.com/videos/2016/08/15/hidden-f

 

 

Mae Jemison was the first African-American female astronaut. A bright and energetic girl, she also became a doctor and served in the Peace Corps. Mae is also a dancer, a teacher, a speaker, and an author.

Mae was born on October 17, 1956, in Decatur, Alabama. Seeking better educational and work opportunities her family moved to Chicago when Mae was three years old.

A bright student Mae learned how to read before she went to school. She told her kindergarten teacher that she wanted to be a scientist when she grew up. There weren’t very many African-American scientists in the 1960’s but that didn’t stop Mae. She loved astronomy and often looked up at the stars and dreamed. During her school years Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon. Mae was determined to go into space some day.

In 1977 Mae went to medical school. She had to choose between two careers – dancer or doctor. Mae decided that she could be a doctor and still dance, but she could not doctor if she was a dancer. The energetic and practical Mae went to medical school. Later when she got to go into space she proved that she could do both by dancing in the shuttle!! Mae took a poster of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater with her on her flight.

When Mae became a doctor she wanted to help poor people and so starting in 1983 she traveled to Africa and served with the Peace Corps. She served in Liberia and Sierra Leone.

In 1985 Mae returned to California to work at a hospital. This was when she pursued her dream of becoming an astronaut. She applied at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). One year later she began her training at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The first woman in space was Sally Ride and the first African-American in space was Guion Bluford. These astronauts were an inspiration to Mae as she trained. Mae learned about the space shuttle she would be working on. She had to get use to zero gravity and the limits of space. She would be doing scientific experiments on board the shuttle.

In 1987, during Mae’s training the space shuttle Challenger exploded killing all astronauts on board. This disaster was somewhat of a setback in the space program but Mae was still as determined as ever to be an astronaut. Mae was one of only 15 candidates chosen out of about 2000 applicants.

Another person who was an inspiration for Mae was Nichelle Nichols, who is famous for her role as Lieutenant Uhura on Star Trek.  In 1993, Mae Jemison starred in: Star Trek: The Next Generation (1993) – as Lieutenant Palmer, episode “Second Chances”. She was the first real live astronaut to appear on Star Trek.

On September 12, 1992, Mae Jemison became the first African-American women to go into space on the space shuttle Endeavour. The crew stayed in space for over 190 hours (nearly 8 days). Mae’s experiments were used to see the effects of zero gravity on the human body.

In 1993, Mae left NASA so that she could get involved in other projects. She wanted to encourage young people to follow their dreams. She began an international science camp program for teenagers called The Earth We Share.

Other achievements for Mae Jemison include:

  1. The founding of the Jemison Institute. 1995
  2. College Professor, Dartmouth College. 1995
  3. The 100 Year Starship Program. Mae joined in 2011. The program’s goal is to help humans travel to the stars in the next 100 years.
  4. International Space Hall of Fame. NASA Space Flight Medal.
  5. Awarded the Doctor of Engineering (honorary) degree in 2007.
  6. Mae has also written articles and books including “Journey Through Our Solar System (True Books: Dr. Mae Jemison and 100 Year Starship) 2013.

 

Below are the links to two interesting YouTube videos with pictures and interviews of Mae Jemison that I think you might enjoy:

Mae Jemison: I Wanted To Go Into Space, July 31, 2014

https://youtu.be/B0vGDfuWhfI

Mae Jemison – Mini Bio, January 12, 2012

https://youtu.be/EgOaIKshbIU

 

 

 

 

 

Through love and faith and determination I have been persistently facing obstacles, small and large, and I have made them stepping stones upon which to rise.          Mary McLeod Bethune

Mary McLeod Bethune is remembered as an educator and an activist. Mary was born with three strikes against her – she was poor, black, and female. This indomitable woman who believed that “Love, not hate, has been the fountain of my fullness” spent her life building a better world.

Mary McLeod Bethune was born on July 10, 1875 near Mayesville, South Carolina. This was during the period of ‘reconstruction’ in the South. Tempers often ran as hot as the weather and as the nation adjusted, unfair anti-black violence escalated. Through it all many black men and women maintained their faith in God. There was a strong belief that education would raise the status of black people in the perceptions of others and would result in better jobs.

Originally Mary trained at Moody Bible Institute (as it is called today) to become a missionary to Africa. It seems incredible to us now, but she was told that black women were not allowed to go on the missionfield. This didn’t stop Mary for long. Realizing that this setback was only a ‘stepping stone upon which to rise’ she put her heart and soul into educating poor black children, starting with girls. Mary believed that as the mothers in the homes, girls would grow up to have a profound impact on their children’s education.

Mary married Albert McLeod Bethune in 1898. They had one son. Sadly, due to disagreements that couldn’t be reconciled Mary and Albert ended the marriage in 1907.

Mary founded the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute for Negro Girls in Daytona, Florida in 1904. She started with only five students but the school grew to over 250 students in only a few years. Mary remained the president and leader until 1942. In 1923 the school combined with the Cookman Institute for Men. The newly combined school, called the Bethune-Cookman College, was one of the few places where African-American students could get a college degree.

Besides her important work at the school, Mary also became politically involved. She was president of the Florida chapter of the National Association of Colored Women for many years.  Mary worked with presidents Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover, and Franklin D. Roosevelt to improve life for African-Americans. She served on many committees and started up her own organization – the National Council of Negro Women. In 1936 President Roosevelt appointed her to be the director of the Division of Negro Affairs of the National Youth Administration. In this position Mary was able to help young people find jobs. At this time Mary also served as an advisor to both Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt.

In 1942 Mary retired from Bethune-Cookman college. She moved to Washington DC and lived there for several years. She was an early member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. In the early 1950’s, President Truman appointed her to be the official delegate to Liberia for the inauguration of their new president.

Eventually Mary returned to Florida to retire. She passed away on May 18, 1955.

Before she died Mary wrote “My Last Will and Testament.” She wanted to leave her people with a legacy of serving. Here are her ‘bequests’.

             I leave you love.
             I leave you hope.
             I leave you the challenge of developing confidence in one another.
             I leave you a thirst for education.
             I leave you a respect for the uses of power. (This power should be placed on the side of human justice.)
             I leave you faith.
             I leave you racial dignity.
             I leave you a desire to live harmoniously with your fellow men.
             I leave you finally a responsibility to our young people.

Faith Courage, brotherhood, dignity, ambition, responsibility – these are needed today as never before. We must cultivate them and use them as tools for our task of completing the establishment of equality for the Negro.

If I have a legacy to leave my people, it is my philosophy of living and serving. As I face tomorrow, I am content, for I think I have spent my life well. I pray now that my philosophy may be helpful to those who share my vision of a world of Peace, Progress, Brotherhood and Love.

 

In 1973, eighteen years after her passing,  Mary McLeod Bethune was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame. In 1974, a seventeen-foot bronze sculpture commemorating Mary’s work in education was erected in Lincoln Park, Washington DC. It is the first statue ever dedicated on federal land to honor either an African-American or a woman.

 

The U.S. Postal Service issued a stamp in her honor in 1985.

 

The Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site was opened in 1994.

 

 

 

I found a wonderful video production of Mary’s life on YouTube. It is in three parts totaling a little over 26 minutes. It gives great historical background and contains many contemporary photos. I highly recommend it!!

 YouTube:

  1.  Mary McLeod Bethune Part One desktop, Jan. 24, 2009, Brian Stewart 9:42

https://youtu.be/CTEYr8cd1us

2. Mary McLeod Bethune Part Two desktop, 9:46

https://youtu.be/-6zHh9U8ZYI

3. Mary McLeod Bethune Part Three desktop, 6:44

https://youtu.be/encR1RbFk3w

 

 

 

 

Born in 1892 in a poor black community in Atlanta, Texas, Bessie Coleman was not encouraged to follow her dreams. At the time, colored*** children were not expected to finish school, let alone have the ambition to fly. But nothing could stop Bessie. She worked hard and became the first woman of color to obtain an international flying license. She would go on to become famous nationally for her feats in an airplane as well as her fierce determination and integrity.

Bessie had to work to have the money to go to school. When her funds ran out she moved to Chicago to join her brothers in 1915. Her brother fought in WWI and returned home with stories of French female pilots. Bessie was intrigued and tried to enroll in pilot school. No one would take a black woman as a student.

She saved her money and took French classes. With the help of Robert Abbott, publisher of the most famous African-American newspaper in the United States, Bessie went to France. She was accepted at one of the country’s top flight schools. Though she was the only black woman in her class, she was determined to succeed.

Bessie knew that flying was dangerous. She saw planes crash, but that didn’t stop her. On June 15, 1921, Bessie received her international pilot’s license. She flew in air shows all over Europe. Then Bessie returned to the United States.

She was sure she could find work as a pilot with her prestigious license but few people were willing to hire black females. Bessie went back to Europe for more training. She learned how to do stunt flying and daredevil feats that would become known as ‘barnstorming’. She became famous for her aerial maneuvers – multiple loops, spins, barrel rolls and dives across the sky. By the time Bessie returned to the United States in 1922 she was quite famous.

Bessie had her first air show in America on Labor Day, 1922. The following year she was hurt badly in a crash. The indomitable “Queen Bess” was flying again three months later. Also nicknamed ‘Brave Bess’, she continued to cause a sensation with her flying for the next five years.

Bessie wanted to do more than just amaze people with her flying ability. She wanted her life to show the world what women of color could do. Bessie traveled around the country lecturing audiences in churches, theaters and schools about flying. She showed films of her work to encourage colored people to follow their dreams.

Using her popularity as leverage, Bessie refused to appear in places where there was segregation. She insisted for example, that white and colored be allowed to use the same entrances to the shows. She insisted that the show promoters treat everyone the same. Bessie also wanted to open a flight school for colored people.

Bessie’s story ended tragically and much too soon. In 1926, only 34 years of age, Bessie and another pilot, William D. Wills were flying to Orlando, Florida to attend an air show when Williams lost control of the plane. Bessie had unbuckled her belt so she could scout the area better and she fell to her death from 3500 feet in the air. Wills was also killed as the plane crashed.

Over 10,000 people came to pay their respects at Bessie’s funeral in Chicago. Black pilots from the Chicago area instituted an annual fly over of her grave on the anniversary of her death, April 30. This year’s flyover, 2017, will be the 38th.

In 1929 William J. Powell founded the Bessie Coleman Aero Club. In 1977 the Bessie Coleman Aviators Club was founded. Bessie is remembered as a woman who persevered against great odds to fulfill her dream. She is a great role model for young people to follow their dreams.

***At the time, black people were referred to as ‘colored’. The term ‘African-American’ did not come into being until a few decades later.

You can see some wonderful pictures of Bessie on the following YouTube sites:

1.Bessie Coleman on youtube.com

https://youtu.be/HPmMHuO5XSY

2. Bessie Coleman – An American Hero ( many great pictures! )

https://youtu.be/jYYy-dT4498

The YouTube site below has some video of that period of time showing some aerial stunts:

Bessie Coleman – Smithsonian Channel   VIDEO – “The First Female African American Pilot”

https://youtu.be/wckEiKzCBqc

A great little book, written for young readers is:

Bessie Coleman: Trailblazing Pilot, from Scholastic, Inc., Rookie Biographies Series, 2016. Written by Carol Alexander.

 

 

 

 

The Wife of Job

There was a man in the land of Uz whose name was Job; and that man was blameless, upright, fearing God and turning away from evil. Seven sons and three daughters were born to him.  (Job 1:1,2).

What readers often take away from the book of Job is how utterly unfair Job’s trials seemed to be. Here was a man who was so righteous that he even offered sacrifices to God for his children in case they had been sinning. Things were going along really well for Job and his wife before Satan came along and tried to make him deny God.

God allowed Satan to take away Job’s ten children, his livestock, and his servants. Job did not sin but replied, “Naked I came from my mother’s womb, and naked I shall return there. The Lord gave and the Lord has taken away. Blessed be the name of the Lord” (Job 1:21).

Next, Satan asked God if he could ruin Job’s health. God gave Satan permission to afflict Job’s body, but to spare his life. Satan smote Job with sore boils from his head to his feet. We are not sure what disease caused these boils but they were so painful that Job wished he had never been born (Job 3:1).

After Satan’s attack we find Job sitting by the ashes, scraping himself with a potsherd. This was a fragment of a piece of pottery that was to scrape away the pus and perhaps the worms or maggots that got on Job’s body. Besides possibly sterilizing the potsherd in the fire, the ashes were there for Job to sprinkle over his head as people did in his day when they were in mourning.

This is how Job’s wife finds him when she comes to talk to him. We are usually shocked at what she says and she has been castigated for it by historians and theologians ever since. After her husband became terribly sick and covered with boils, Job’s wife says, “Do you still hold fast your integrity? Curse God and die!” (Job 2:9).

Why would Job’s wife even say such a thing to Job?

Let’s take a moment and think about the story from her perspective. First of all, let us remember that those ten children who died were her children too. Perhaps Job’s wife was in such despair after seeing all of her children die that she wondered if God was taking away His blessings for some reason. She was also aware of the deaths of all of their servants and livestock.

The Bible only records this one conversation between Job and his wife. We do not know much else except that she stayed with him all through his trials. She must have served him and nursed him as best as she could. Job’s wife had no servants to help her wash and clean her husband’s puss and worm infested garments. How much time would she have had to spend patching them up or finding new ones?

Maybe it was hard for Job’s wife to see her husband in so much pain. It must also have been painful for her while her husband spent his whole time by the fire. She had probably been used to all of the daily acts of love between a husband and wife. Now her life would be the opposite. She would no longer be able to be comforted by her husband but must work hard to help him in this dire time of need.

It is also possible that Job’s wife was merely responding to what she overheard her husband saying as she brought him food or gave him other care. Throughout chapter 3, Job lamented, “Let the day perish on which I was to be born, and the night which said, ‘A boy is conceived.’ May that day be darkness; let not God above care for it, nor light shine on it. ….. Why did I not die at birth, come forth from the womb and expire? Why is light given to him who suffers, and life to the bitter of soul, who longs for death, but there is none.” (Job 3:3,4,11,20,21).

Though her response was discouraging at the very least, Job’s wife may have wished that God would take him home and release him from his suffering. I recall a friend who had cancer whose pain was so awful that he prayed that God would just take him home. His wife admitted later that she prayed that God would give her husband release from pain one way or another. Surely anyone who has watched a loved one suffer so much can understand Job’s wife’s agony.

How did Job respond to his wife’s counsel? “You speak as one of the foolish women speaks. Shall we indeed accept good from God and not accept adversity?” (Job 2:10).

Job said that his wife speaks “as” one of the foolish women speaks. He didn’t say she was a foolish woman. He remonstrated with her. Then he implored her to accept whatever came from God. We are not told if she repented at this time, but we do know that she stuck with her husband. She did not go somewhere else in spite of the fact that not only had their children been killed, but also all of their donkeys, oxen, sheep, and camels. Their livelihood was gone. Job was in no shape to go out and work. And he couldn’t get any help because all of his servants had been captured or killed as well. Job’s wife went from being very rich to very poor with no prospects. In our day, this would be a good time to run home to mother!

I do not know what it is like to lose a child, let alone all of my children at once. And Job’s wife didn’t even know why. Perhaps we should give her the benefit of the doubt as a frail human being. Imagine day after day watching your husband suffer so much. Anyone who has watched a loved one suffer will understand how Job’s wife felt. And imagine the helpless feeling because she did not know why God was allowing this.

Nowhere in the story does God tell Job what is going on. Job never finds out that Satan was involved. Job never finds out why God allowed all of this to happen to him. Why would we think Job’s wife should know any more than her husband does?

Not only was her husband ill and needing her sustenance, but now three guests show up and later a fourth man will show up. They stay for many days. Customs at the time demanded that Job’s wife feed and show hospitality to them.

Job’s three friends come to visit him and “console” him. They find all kinds of reasons for why Job is being tried. The friends mostly tell Job that he is suffering because he sinned. Bildad the Shuhite says for example, “Does God pervert justice? Or does the Almighty pervert what is right? If your sons sinned against Him, then He delivered them into the power of their transgression. … If you are pure and upright, surely now He would rouse Himself for you and restore your righteous estate.” (Job 8:3-6)

Wow! With friends like these who needs enemies? Truly Job’s wife had a tremendous job on her hands to comfort her husband in spite of his companions.

Daily she would have spent many hours just making food and taking it to them. Where did she find ingredients for the food? She would have had to gather the grain and thresh it herself. Even if they had stored grain, Job’s wife would have had to pound it herself and prepare it for baking. She would have gathered the wood for the fire and maintained it herself. No mention is made of any other neighbors or help coming for her. The only other people we hear about are Job’s three friends and they mostly sat around talking to her husband.

Did Job’s wife listen in to their conversations? Did she wait to hear the answers to her husband’s questions? As she served him did Job’s wife come to acknowledge her sin and turn and give honor to God?

Job’s wife was a witness to Job’s growth in knowledge and sanctification. At one point in his conversation with his friends Job confessed, “As for me, I know that my Redeemer lives, and at the last He will take His stand on the earth.” (Job 19:25)

Eventually Job realized the truth. Job finally acknowledged that Jehovah is Lord of all. Job was willing to submit to God. He praised God and said, “I know that You can do all things, and that no purpose of Yours can be thwarted. Who is this that hides counsel without knowledge? Therefore, I have declared that which I did not understand, things too wonderful for me, which I did not know. Hear, now, and I will speak; I will ask You, and You instruct me. I have heard of You by the hearing of the ear; but now my eye sees you; Therefore, I retract, and I repent in dust and ashes” (Job 42:2-6).

Job passed the test. His wife was with him. We hope that she followed his lead and humbly repented to God.

In any event, God exonerated Job and told the friends that they were wrong. Then God blessed Job and his wife. He gave them ten more children and twice as many belongings as before. Job gave all of his children, sons and daughters, an equal inheritance. His daughters were considered the fairest in the land. Surely their mother had something to do with that.

 

OUR PEOPLE: The remarkable story of William and Catherine Booth and the Salvation Army

William Booth started out as a traveling evangelist. The Booths were very poor and seldom had a home of their own. Then one night as William was coming home from a meeting he passed the doors of a gin palace in East London. This was the part of London where unfortunate people lived – alcoholics, criminals, and prostitutes. William had been preaching in places like West London, where upper class people lived – people who could put enough money in the hat when it was passed to put at least some food on the table at the Booth household.

 

On that fateful night, William thought he heard an urgent voice speaking to him, a voice that would ask a great sacrifice from him and Catherine. The voice asked, “Where can you go and find such heathen as these, and where is there so great a need for your labours?” William knew the answer, “These will be our people.”

Catherine believed that they should answer this call, though she knew that they would never be able to ask the East-Enders for money as they had been able to before from their “respectable” audiences. This was huge step of faith and William and Catherine trusted the Lord to take care of them.

For William and Catherine their work was all about the glory of God and the salvation of souls. And so the little Whitechapel mission would turn into the Christian Mission and eventually into what we know today as the Salvation Army.

The video: OUR PEOPLE: The remarkable story of William and Catherine Booth and the Salvation Army, tells the story of how William and Catherine Booth took God’s love to the poor. This is a very inspirational documentary.

It is not a live action production. The story is told using over 500 images and interviews with 11 historians and storytellers. The many beautiful pictures of 1800’s London makes the story very interesting. There is beautiful background music of familiar hymns. There are live interviews with two of the Booths’ grandchildren.

I really appreciated the account of the now forgotten social work of William and Catherine Booth. Today ‘human trafficking’ is much talked about. Many do not realize however that girls as young as 13 years of age were being trafficked in Britain in the 1800’s because the age of consent was 13. The Booths and Catherine’s friend Josephine Butler worked for many years to get the age of consent raised even to 16. William and Catherine rescued 100’s of young girls and women out of prostitution. They opened homes for them and helped them get other employment. The ‘Army’ was to make caring for the poor their main ministry even to this day.

There is so much more and I think you will really be blessed when you watch this video. It is easily found on the internet. It also features some bonus material – interviews with historians.

Remember how much good those cheerful bell ringers have done over the last 150 years when you see them next Christmas!!!

 

 

Nearly 500 years ago, October 31, 1517, Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses on the door of the church in Wittenberg, Germany. This began the start of the period in Church History known as the Reformation.

In honor of this anniversary, many books on Luther and Calvin and other Reformers are hitting the bookshelves this year. But did you know that these great men had wives? Yes, and both men would thank God publicly for the blessing of their wives. The video I recommend this week will tell the story of one of the humblest, yet loved women of the Reformation.

This month is Women in History month. Many women have come to love the story of Katherine Luther as an example of courage and the meaning of the sacredness of everyday living. I highly recommend a video that documents Katie’s life from early childhood until her untimely death. The video – “The Morning Star of Wittenberg: The Life of Katie Luther” – was produced by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and is distributed by Vision Video. (easily found on the internet)

It was often thought that only vocations in the church were sacred – being a priest or a nun. But Martin and Katie became heroes of everyday people when they showed the holiness and godliness of a beautiful, loving marriage and home life. Today many pastor’s wives model their lives after Katherine von Bora Luther.

 

 

This video features the insights of Dr. Kirsi Stjerna, Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, and author of “Women and the Reformation”.

 

 

German theologian Dr. Martin Treu, Curator of the Luther Museum in Wittenberg, gives us interesting historical background to the places and events in Katie’s life. The production is beautifully done and the story leaves you wanting to hear more about Katherine. I would suggest Dr. Stjerna’ book.

 

Katherine contributed much to her husband’s ministry.  She certainly helped with his understanding of marriage, love, and family life. By doing this, she contributed much to the spread of the Gospel. She modeled the ideal Christian woman.  By being a Proverbs 31 woman, her husband’s ministry was expanded further. Because she could manage everything on the home front, including the Black Cloister, Luther was able to be away on long journeys, preaching and teaching, knowing that he could come home to a restful, well-ordered, spiritually invigorating home – even one that had some of the best beer around!!

 

Katherine loved Christ. She lived her life to the fullest. She showed us how to live the Christian life in our marriages, families, and communities. It takes a lot of courage to face the daily mundane tasks of cooking, cleaning, and mending. As we contemplate on the life of Katherine von Bora Luther, I hope it will give us renewed strength to find joy in whatever calling God has given us.